Summer Reading

One School, One Book

Summer 2018 is the third year of the One School, One Book program. Having one book that the whole community reads together over the summer promotes literacy and community-wide discussion of issues, questions, and themes important to our families, school, and society. Novels we have selected in the past include Anthony Doerr's All the Light We Cannot See and Immaculee Ilibagiza's Left to Tell.

The One School, One Book selection for 2018 is Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom. All students in all grades are expected to read the novel before the first day of school so that they are ready to engage with the book in all of their classes through discussions, projects, assessments, performances, and other assignments.The inside flap of the book shares why this book will have a 'gently, irrevocable impact' on all who read it:"Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher, or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, helped you see the world as a more profound place, gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it.

For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago.
Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded, and the world seemed colder. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you, receive wisdom for your busy life today the way you once did when you were younger?

Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying, Morrie visited with Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final "class": lessons in how to live.

Tuesdays with Morrie is a magical chronicle of their time together, through which Mitch shares Morrie's lasting gift with the world."While this non-fiction book is 20 years old, the Summer Reading Committee selected it for its appeal to readers of all ages, its humanity and compassion, and its realistic discussion on the importance of relationships. Since its publication, Tuesdays with Morrie has sold over 14 million copies and has been published in over 45 languages.

Students in honors and/or AP English classes will have an additional reading assignment that will be given to them within the next week. Summer reading information will also posted on the website.

AP Language and Composition

Click here for pdf of assignment

Dear future Junior AP Student,

Welcome to AP Language and Composition! In preparation for our study of American literature next year, I am including the following directions for your summer reading assignment. This summer you will read The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and annotate as you read in order to complete a short writing reflection. This assignment will be due on the first day that you return to school. This will be in addition to our one school, one book that you also must read by the first day of school.

In exploring this text, we will engage a set of themes that our contemporary American experience has made imminent: our nation’s ideals of family values, poverty, wealth, success, and “hard work.” We will work on recognizing, questioning, and articulating the inherent values, beliefs, and practices of the “American Experience.” Our focus with this work will be the exploration of how some groups may be disenfranchised by the expectations implicit in our society’s concept of the American Dream. We will use Fitzgerald’s book to research and debate certain cultural assumptions that surround the idea of the American Dream.

The ideology inherent within the “American Dream” tells us that, in America, anything is possible! In other words, anyone can “make it” in this great country, simply by “pulling oneself up by one’s bootstraps.” This theory defines hard work as being the key to social and economic success. Therefore, its implications reveal that those who are not financially successful must not “work hard enough.” In reading our summer reading book, we will explore how these assumptions are at play in our contemporary atmosphere.

Fitzgerald’s novel, written in 1925, investigates the culture of the Jazz Age and the ways in which socioeconomic success defines self-identity in modern America. As you read this book, I want you to heavily annotate it while considering the following questions.

Annotating for The Great Gatsby: Consider all of the following and mark passages in the novel.

1.Relationships between characters in the text.

2.Fitzgerald’s opinion of Jay Gatsby.

3.Nick’s opinion of Jay Gatsby.

4.Fitzgerald’s view of the American Dream.

5.Fitzgerald’s descriptions of wealth and how they relate to his own views about excess.

6.Nature of love between characters in the novel

7.Motifs of haunting, ghosts, or nostalgia in the novel.

After you finish reading, write an essay between 700-900 words answering the following question:

Does Fitzgerald believe that the American dream is an inclusive or exclusive ideology?

Your essay must be typed in MLA format and have perfect grammar. You should include at least 4 quotes (no longer than 15 words each) from The Great Gatsby to support your reasoning. Make sure that you introduce each quote with its context (what was happening at this point in the book? Who was there? Etc). Then, make sure to fully explain how the quote supports your argument. You should include a works cited page. Your paper should be well organized with an introduction and thesis statement, body paragraphs with topic sentences, concrete details, and commentary, and a conclusion.

Your paper is due to turnitin.com before our first class. You must also submit a hard copy in class.

Info to enroll in the class on turnitin:

Class ID: 18096053

Code: mooreap

AP-English IV

Click here for pdf download of assignment


Welcome to AP-English IV!

During the summer I would like for you to read Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. I have provided some topics of interest for you to consider as you read:

To what extent does religion play a major role in the novel?

How does Tolstoy address religion and Christian values in the novel?

How does Tolstoy manipulate the readers’ feelings toward various characters?

Tolstoy does remarkable work of providing intricate details regarding his characters. What do these details do, and how do the details change your feelings about some of the issues that the characters face?

Compare and contrast how adultery is treated when Stiva commits it to when Anna commits it. Why do you think there is a difference, and what does it mean?

Do a bit of delving into Russian history. What was going on at the time that Tolstoy

wrote this novel?

What can we ascertain about Russia and its people during this time from this novel? Also, consider Western Europe. How was it different? Why do you think Tolstoy includes Western European elements in this novel?

Lastly, there are vast differences concerning how female and male characters are

treated in the novel. Consider why Tolstoy shines such a bright light on these

differences. What might he be attempting to accomplish, and is he successful?

After you finish reading write a 700-900 word essay based on one of the questions

listed above.

Your essay must have perfect grammar and be in MLA format. You should include at

least 4 quotes (no longer than 15 words each) from the primary text to support your

reasoning. Make sure that you introduce each quote with its context (what was

happening at this point in the book? Who was there? Etc). Then, make sure to fully

explain how the quote supports your argument. You should include a works cited

page. Your paper should be well organized with an introduction and thesis

statement, body paragraphs with topic sentences, concrete details, and commentary,

and a conclusion.

When you finish writing your essay, you will need to submit it to turnitin.com. Your Course is English IV AP and your enrollment key is Milton.

Good luck! I hope you enjoy the reading, and I look forward to meeting you all in August!

Janet Baarsch
jbaarsch@loyolaprep.org


Pre AP-English II

Click here for pdf download of assignment

Welcome to Pre-AP English II

During the summer I would like for you to read Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. I have provided some topics of interest for you to consider as you read these this work..

Some things that you should consider as you read are:

Jane is both the narrator and the protagonist of the novel. How do her character’s experiences affect her voice as a narrator? To what extent is she a credible narrator, and to what extent are her perceptions biased?

Novels from this period in English literature were often meant to educate. What lesson(s) does Bronte attempt to teach about morality through Jane’s character?

What can this novel tell us about the roles of women in VIctorian English society?

The novel interrogates the concepts of social class and status in society. How does Jane’s status allow her to navigate social situations? What difficulties does she have? How is her role as a servant different from other characters roles?

Jane Eyre is an example of a gothic novel. Explore the elements of a gothic novel, and explain how the novel fits into the gothic novel tradition.

Compare and contrast Bertha Mason and Jane Eyre. Why are the women treated so differently? What does Bertha represent?

After you finish reading, write a 500-700 word essay based on one of the questions

listed above.

Your essay must have perfect grammar and be in MLA format. You should include at

least 4 quotes (no longer than 15 words each) from the primary text to support your

reasoning. Make sure that you introduce each quote with its context (what was

happening at this point in the book? Who was there? Etc). Then, make sure to fully

explain how the quote supports your argument. You should include a works cited

page. Your paper should be well organized with an introduction and thesis

statement, body paragraphs with topic sentences, concrete details, and commentary,

and a conclusion.

After you write your essay, you will need to submit it to turnitin.com. Your course is Pre-AP English II-1, and your enrollment key is Shakespeare.

Good luck! I hope you enjoy the reading, and I look forward to meeting you all in August!

Janet Baarsch

jbaarsch@loyolaprep.org

English I-Honors

Click here for pdf download of assignment



Sella--Summer Reading Assignment--English I Honors

Tuesdays with Morrie--by Mitch Albom

To Kill a Mockingbird--Harper Lee


In addition to reading your two summer reading books, you will also complete two assignments that go along with the novel. For the novel, Tuesdays with Morrie, you will be creating a soundtrack and for To Kill a Mockingbird you will create a “Close Reading Log.” Both assignments will need to be typed in Google Docs in order to be turned in on turnitin.com during the first week of school.


Soundtrack for Tuesdays with Morrie--While reading, think carefully about the characters and themes present in the book. You will be considering these as you select at least 10 songs for a soundtrack for the text. No two songs can be from the same artist, and you should strive to have songs from a variety of genres.

Your soundtrack will include at least one song that relates to:

  1. THREE important events from the book
  2. TWO different characters
  3. TWO of the Tuesday Topics
  4. ONE song that defines Mitch and Morrie’s relationship
  5. ONE theme (theme must be more than just one word)
  6. ONE of your choice (symbol, conflict, resolution, quote, an additional event, theme or character, etc)

For each song selection:

  1. Title line should include the song title, artist and element (character name, event, etc)
  2. Explanation: Beneath the title line, describe the character, event, theme, etc. and how it relates to the song. Why did you choose this song for this element of the novel? Explain how the song/lyrics connect to, reveal or enhance your description of the character, event or theme. Back your claim with evidence from the book (quote, passage, event). If there are certain lyrics that led you to associate the song to the element then be sure to note those specific lyrics.


Close Reading Log for To Kill a Mockingbird--As you read the novel you will complete a log of your “close reading notes.” Below is what you should be looking for as you “close read.” The questions listed are simply a guide to what you should be looking for. You must answer AT LEAST TWO of the questions listed for each category in bold. There will be a completed “Close Reading Log” for the following sections:

Chapters 1-6 Chapters 17-22

Chapters 7-11 Chapters 23-27

Chapters 12-16 Chapters 28-31


*Remember: You will need to type the logs in Google Docs in order to have a digital copy ready to be turned in on turnitn.com during the first week of school.


What to Look for When Close Reading

Setting-- when and where is the event occurring? Could there be any symbolic significance to the author's choice of setting? What might the purpose be for this setting? Did the setting change? What is the significance of the change?

Action/Details-- What is occurring in the passage? Why did the author choose those particular actions? Any strong quotes that help understand the actions/details. Events that help back up what you believe the theme might be.

Characters—How were certain characters impacted by the above actions/details? What type of character are they? How were they developed throughout the passage? How did they change? Did they change? A quote or action that helps define each character. How you feel about the character’s personality and events that back that up.

Conflict—Internal/External? Explain. Man vs. Self/Man/Society/Nature? Explain. What is the conflict and how was it caused?

Tone-- What is the author's attitude toward the subject? What does that suggest about the author? the topic? Has the tone changed since the previous section? A quote that helps back up your claim of what the tone might be.

Mood-- The atmosphere, feeling or vibe a writer creates through their writing and details selected. Ex. A story taking place at night on Halloween creates a dark and scary mood. A quote that helps back up your claim of what the mood might be. How did the author make you feel while reading? Has the mood changed since the last section?

Imagery—Note any use of great imagery/detailed/descriptive language and how does this affect the reader. Did the imagery help set the tone/mood/setting? Did it make it confusing or more difficult?

Language (Trope)—Any uses of figurative language. Metaphors, similes, symbolism, etc. Write down the quote and explain how it may have impacted a character or how it may have impacted the reader. Why might the author have chosen to use the trope in that instance? Was the author successful? How did the author’s writing make you feel?

Time-- How much time elapses? How is the passage of time (if any) depicted? How is it significant to the text?

Theme-- What message is the author trying to convey? What lesson is being taught?